detailMedical Negligence

Falls in Hospitals and Nursing Homes

Falls in Hospitals and Nursing Homes

Falls in Hospitals Lawyers

Falls among inpatients are the most frequently reported safety incidents in Australian Hospitals today. Majority of hospital falls result in some physical injury and fractures. No fall is harmless, it always leads to psychological sequelae leading to lost confidence, delays in functional recovery and prolonged hospitalisation, especially in the elderly population. Although prevention of falls can be complex, a number measures can often be implemented in order to minimise the risk of falls occurring.

Our team of specialist medical negligence lawyers are experienced in acting for patients in medical negligence compensation claims involving hospital falls all around Australia. We understand the devastating effects of having suffered an injury or a worsened medical condition, or experienced the loss of a loved one, because of a negligently caused fall at a hospital.

We’ll be here for you every step of the way guiding you through the process in your medical negligence claim. We have the expert knowledge, expertise and a proven history needed to obtain outstanding results in all types of medical negligence compensation claims involving hospital falls.

We’ll act for you in your hospital fall medical negligence claim on a no win, no fee basis with no upfront costs. See our why choose us page for many more reasons as to why so many Australians choose Longton Compensation Lawyers over anyone else for their medical negligence compensation claim arising out of hospital falls.

How are falls in hospitals usually prevented?

Hospital staff must be aware of their patient’s risk factors that make them at an increased risk of falling. They must, also, implement strategies to prevent and minimise falls. These strategies include:

  • Performing a thorough risk or falls assessment to identify “high risk” patients.
  • Having regard to the patient’s medication that predisposes them to the risk of falls (such as diazepam).
  • Undertaking regular observations and monitoring of “high risk” patients.
  • Utilisation of beds positioned “low” to the ground for patients at risk of falling or rolling out of bed.
  • Utilisation of bed or chair alarms for patients with mobility issues, who require supervision to mobilise, but who do not ask or wait for assistance.
  • Utilisation of bed or chair alarms for patients with mobility issues, who require supervision to mobilise, but who do not ask or wait for assistance.
  • Ensuring that nurse call buttons are working.
  • Utilising protective equipment such as hip protectors or helmets.
  • One on one supervision.
  • Minimising delay in nursing assistance when called for.

Contact us today, and start with a free consultation by clicking “Make a Booking” to receive our preliminary expert advice.  

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